Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Hunting Island Scenes Part Seven

My wheel estate instinctively veers off course to head for Hunting Island whenever possible. I am enchanted with this magical island that I first  glimpsed when I was around 5 or 6 years old. I was ready to plant my roots.  


I've always wanted to live here forever. I still do. I've tried 9 different ways  to get a workamping assignment here. But alas, they want couples only for the campground. It makes me so sad. I would be such a huge asset to them but my solo status seems to make that impossible.  


Yesterday Harley and I walked the entire campground past 210 camping lots. We had a cold snap that plunged temperatures down to 46F degrees last night. By the time Harley and I were ready for a walk, it was up to 52F degrees. By afternoon it was 74F degrees, with milder nights planned for the rest of the week. 


South meets north. 


That morning Harley wore a sweater with a plaid flannel jacket while I had on boots, long thick leggings, a camouflaged shirt and a very heavy jacket, with nice warm pockets. As we walked around, Harley was shivering as we encountered other southerners bundled up in hats, sweaters, jackets, long pants, socks, gloves and boots.  The northerners were walking around in shorts, lightweight shirts and sandals or sneakers,  teasing the southerners, saying this is not cold. 






Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com
You just never know what is going to wash up on the beach next.
This horseshoe crab washed arrived with a hitchiker attached to her shell. 
She may have been attempting to lay eggs.  Females dig a hole between the spring high tide and low tide to bury 4,000 or more eggs which are about the size of a pinhead.  Horseshoe crabs like to live in the intertidal flats the first 9-12 years before reaching a reproductive age. As adults they often move into deeper waters, living up to about 18 years old. 


Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com
A blue claw crab was left behind at low tide.  I have no idea where the rest of his body is. A crab can lose his claw and survive. He will eventually grow a new one, but if he loses both, then he becomes easy prey. 


Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com
A laughing gull shorebird. 



Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com
Hunting Island boasts 5 miles or so of unspoiled beach. 




Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com


Driftwood  makes interesting art from nature. 


Hunting Island State Park and Campground in South Carolina  photo by  DearMissMermaid.Com


Home sweet home this week.  No two campsites at Hunting Island are identical in size nor terrain. Mine happened to be rather large with tropical trees, sand and grass. I used lumber underneath the right front tire to level up the wheel estate. 


Amazing what a few inches of hard wood can do.


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Hunting Island Scenes Part One through Six were posted in October 2011:


1 comment:

  1. That's a beautiful site! I've never heard of Hunting Island until now. Must add to bucket list!

    ReplyDelete

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